Our Aurorean Subscribers Sustain Us

By |May 19th, 2016|Uncategorized|0 Comments

The Aurorean has been going strong for over 20 years. We want to take a moment to thank everyone who has supported the Aurorean in those years! As an independent poetry journal, we rely solely on your help to keep the Aurorean a print publication in an age when it is much more cost-efficient to publish online. Whether you’ve bought a copy or copies, donated to our Angels program, or are a valued subscriber, we thank you for making it possible for us to publish over 1,350 poets since 1995.

We are committed to continuing our mission for at least the next twenty years, and we ask you to consider committing to help us achieve that goal. Subscribing to the Aurorean is the most effective way of helping to sustain us in these difficult economic times.

Will you make a commitment? Buckle in for a five-year ride, and we’ll make sure you don’t miss a single issue of New England’s premier independent poetry journal. We’ll also will send you our 20th Anniversary Issue AS WELL AS Favorites from the First Fifteen Years, our beautiful, 115-page acclaimed anthology (finalist in the 2013 Maine Literary Awards) of poems from the first fifteen years of the Aurorean as a thank-you.

Here’s the link: http://encirclepub.com/aurorean/product/aurorean-5-year-subscription/

With gratitude,

Your Editors

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New chapbook release

By |March 21st, 2016|Chapbooks|0 Comments

book cover image

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We are pleased to announce a new chapbook release: A Journal of the Drought Year by Don Thompson. This book of poems explores the arid and brittled facets of experience in living out a year of the enduring California drought. A Journal of the Drought Year is now available for pre-order from the Encircle Publications Book Store. This is a chapbook you won’t want to miss!

Praise for A Journal of the Drought Year:

Don Thompson is a poet with reverence for the natural world, and in his spare but elegant poems he writes about the condition that haunts California today-the drought (“Our rain must be brooding somewhere…” and “The plants that make it/have sparse foliage like an afterthought…”). Thompson creates songs of wonder and hope in A Journal of the Drought Year, transforming the desert world he inhabits into a place where poets can engage in spiritual contemplation, live in the Now and take “lessons in silence,” riding, as one poem puts it, with the Holy Ghost all night if the need arises.
He creates tenable, direct verse about the scarcity of water in an unresponsive and fierce landscape, describing a place of sage and mesquite, dry grass, parched wind and shimmering rock, believing “that next year or the next, water/will flow down from Sacramento, more than a trickle.” In A Journal of the Drought Year, Thompson deals with the loneliness and alienation of contemporary times but with skill and sure instinct, he captures the “words that sometimes come hard,” yet…”hum like a flute underwater,/a note of hope-/this is what you have.”


Diane Moore, Louisiana author, poet (Strand of Beads, Border Press), and blogger, “A Word’s Worth” (revmoore.blogspot.com)

Sample from Entries from a Journal of the Drought Year

14.

After the drought has gone on
and on for a season so unimaginable
no one has ever named it,
the not-a-rainbow will form,
its bands in the primary colors
of dust…

God promising never again
by desiccation, by slow withering.
And then the rain, the rain,
finally the rain

About the poet:

DonThompsonRecently chosen as the first Poet Laureate of Kern County, California, Don Thompson was born and raised in Bakersfield, California, and has lived in the southern San Joaquin Valley for most of his life. Now retired from teaching in the prison system, he lives with his wife, Chris, on her family’s farm in the house that has been home to four generations. Thompson has been publishing poetry since the early sixties, including a dozen books and chapbooks. For more information and links to his publications, visit his website San Joaquin Ink (don-e-thompson.com).

 

Boston Area Small Press and Poetry Scene reviews Surowiecki’s Missing Persons

By |February 18th, 2016|Uncategorized|0 Comments

To read the review click below:

Missing Persons by John Surowiecki

 

Chapbook Open Submissions. Get published!

By |January 7th, 2016|Announcements, Chapbooks|0 Comments

Encircle Publication’s reading period for open chapbook submissions is now open!!  Submit Here
Cover for Answers Instead by Edward J. Rielly Answers Instead by Edward J Rielly is our most recent publication from our open reading periods. Stanford M. Forrester, Editor of bottle rockets and past President of the Haiku Society of America says of Answers Instead  “Each poem in this book evokes the past, but puts us in the present. Once we’ve read these poems, they will unavoidably stay with us for a very long time. This collection of poems is that good. Ed Rielly is a master poet and this book is destined to become part of the American haiku canon.”

Our Books

New England poets flock to anniversary reading in Plymouth

By |December 10th, 2015|events, News|0 Comments

The upcoming Aurorean 20th Anniversary Reading is being featured in Wicked Local Plymouth

Click the link to read the article.

Directions to the reading at the Plymouth Public Library can be found below

Just in time for the holidays

By |November 24th, 2015|News|0 Comments

Gift Cards!

the Aurorean now offers gift cards for purchase. Gift cards are good for any product listed at the Aurorean webstore. This includes subscriptions, single copy orders of the Aurorean in both digital and print as well as Encircle Publications books and chapbooks.

Instructions for purchase:

Customer goes through normal purchase process – Add to cart, checkout, payment, etc.

Quantity can adjusted, if customer wants to purchase more than one gift-card/credit, i.e., A credit for $100 in the form of gifts of $50 each for 2 people. Customer would enter 100 in provided box and increase the quantity to 2.

On checkout page, customer can enter recipient’s details and add a personalized message, if they want to forward the gift-card/credit to someone else.

After payment is completed, a gift-card/credit is generated and forwarded via e-mail to recipient(s).

 

All Encircle Publications books and chapbooks are now available at the Aurorean webstore:

Aurorean gift card recipients will be able to purchase any Encircle Publications book or chapbook (digital or print) listed in the Aurorean webstore.  Encircle Publications books featured below.

Our 5th Annual Chapbook Contest Winner

By |November 14th, 2015|Announcements, News|0 Comments

We are pleased to announce that John Surowiecki has won our 2015 (5th Annual) Chapbook Contest with his manuscript, Missing Persons.

Missing Persons will be available mid-December, and is now available for pre-order.

http://encirclepub.com/product/missing-persons

What Reviewers are Saying:

John Surowiecki is one of our bravest and most humane poets. He is a master of of the elegy, and his considerable talents are on display in Missing Persons, a chapbook that echoes with the music of other lives—lively mazurkas and lonely soprano solos alike.
—Shelley Puhak, author of Guinevere in Baltimore, winner of the 2014 Anthony Hecht Poetry Prize

The missing persons of John Surowiecki will not settle quietly into anonymity.  He elevates lost or forgotten souls out of absence and makes their presence felt, starkly and simply through his exact and moving imagery. These poems are taut and elegiac—heartbreaking, but never despairing. By resurrecting memories through these poignant portraits, Surowiecki offers “the company of words,” as he helps us “understand how the earth absorbs” our loss.
—Amy Nawrocki, author of Reconnaissance and Four Blue Eggs

John Surowiecki is the author of four books of poetry—Flies (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2012), Barney and Gienka (CW Press, 2010), The Hat City after Men Stopped Wearing Hats (Washington Prize, Word Works, 2007) and Watching Cartoons before Attending a Funeral (White Pine Prize, White Pine Press, 2003)—and seven chapbooks. He is the recipient of the Poetry Foundation’s first Pegasus Award for verse drama for his play, My Nose and Me (A TragedyLite or TragiDelight in 33 Scenes), which was performed in New York (AWP), Chicago Shakespeare Theater, the University of Connecticut, and Notre Dame of Maryland University. Surowiecki was awarded the Nimrod Pablo Neruda Prize, and the runner up prize at the Sunken Garden Poetry Festival National Competition. He has won a number of other contests, including those sponsored by Georgia State Review and Common Ground Review. He was also awarded a Poetry Fellowship by the Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism. In addition, Surowiecki’s work has appeared in a number of anthologies, including Sunken Garden Poetry Festival Twentieth Anniversary Anthology (Wesleyan University Press, 2012, the Hecht Prize Anthology (Waywiser Press, 2012), and Seeds of Fire: Contemporary Poetry from the Other U.S.A. (Smokestack Books 2008), and in Alaska Quarterly Review, Carolina Review, Folio, Indiana Review, Margie, Oyez Review, Mississippi Review, Nimrod, Poetry, Prairie Schooner, Redivider, The Southern Review,West Branch, Yemassee, and many other journals.

Surowiecki joins Lisa Bellamy, Laurel Mills, Jeri Theriault, and Ellaraine Lockie in our fine lineup of Annual Chapbook Contest winners.

Encircle Announces its 2015 Pushcart Prize Nominations

By |November 14th, 2015|Announcements|0 Comments

We are pleased to announce our nominations for the Pushcart Prize for 2015!

“Listening to John Coltrane With My Baby Daughter” by David Stankiewicz
from the Aurorean poetry journal Vol. XX Issue 2, 2015

“After Montana” by Ellaraine Lockie
from Where the Meadowlark Sings (chapbook), 2015

“The Red Bones” by Steve Ausherman
from Marking the Bend (chapbook), 2015

“When the Poetry’s Gone” by Gustav Peterson
from When the Poetry’s Gone (chapbook), 2015

“Deer at Sunset” by Laurel Mills
from Hidden Seed (chapbook), 2015

“Elegy for a Copywriter” by John Surowiecki
from Missing Persons (chapbook), forthcoming, December 2015

Encircle’s 2015 publications include two issues of the Aurorean poetry journal, two issues of the Unrorean poetry broadsheet, and five chapbooks. We congratulate all the nominees, and are thankful for the opportunity to publish so many fine poets throughout the year.

20th Anniversary Reading

By |November 14th, 2015|Uncategorized|0 Comments

YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED!

WHERE: PLYMOUTH PUBIC LIBRARY

132 Main Street, Plymouth, MA 02360

WHEN: DECEMBER 12TH, 2015, 2–4pm

Join us for an afternoon of superb poetry as we celebrate 20 years of continuous publication as an independent poetry journal. We will present the work of 30 New England poets whose work appears in this milestone issue, including both of our Featured Poets. Refreshments available; open to the public.

FW2015-16-front

The Aurorean was founded in Plymouth, MA (where Publisher/Editor Cynthia grew up) in 1995 and since, has published over 1,300 poets worldwide and has received national and regional critical acclaim.

We are thankful to Jennifer Harris of the Plymouth Public Library for helping us coordinate this event.

Please Join the Event on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/491123414403402

Library’s Events Calendar: http://www.plymouthpubliclibrary.org/upcoming-events

Go Write Your Heart Out When the Spirit Moves You

By |November 6th, 2015|Uncategorized|0 Comments

It’s a gray November day, except for the overgrown blackberry bushes’ leaves hanging yellow and bright outside my window. Five (work) days ago, I returned home from a cruise to Bermuda. So far, I’ve managed only to unpack, do several loads of laundry, reorganize our recycling, pack up gifts for our 20th Anniversary Aurorean contributors, and reply to the most urgent emails in my Inbox. Already feeling slightly guilty for having accomplished little since my return, that guilt now becomes magnified on this last workday of the week, because I’m feeling tired, unmotivated, and I’m staring out that window.

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Add to that, many of my writer-friends are participating in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) and I’m seeing their word-counts add up on Facebook. They are writing like mad (and more power to them!). Although I love National Poetry Month in April (especially Poem in Your Pocket Day), I don’t even participate in NaPoWriMo because I hate forcing poems out. That’s just me, but even more to feel guilty about.

As I continue to stare out the window (Billy Collins would be pleased), I see some of the leaves rustling out of the corner of my eye. And then I see why. A large doe is feasting on summer’s leftovers. I move closer to the window and see she’s not alone. Her fawn is with her, and both are unaware of me spying on them as they leisurely enjoy the day and its offerings with flicks of their white tails, their noses in the air between bites of vegetation. But they are there for another reason. For me to receive my lesson for the day. As I watch them for fifteen minutes or so, the guilt of the “shoulds” melts away. I SHOULD be watching them—right now, at this moment.

As a matter of fact, what I want to do now is to begin work afresh on Monday. There are deadlines, poems to read and respond to, manuscripts to read and respond to, events to plan, marketing ideas to consider, directories to update, and even a finished children’s book of my own to put the final touches on and to send out for consideration. But there is nothing that can’t wait until Monday. And now, I want to go into my writing room and create a poem. It might be about the deer. It might not. But it won’t be forced, and if it doesn’t come, I’ll move on to another project close to my heart.

No guilt, just creation. Take a moment to look out the window, even if you think there’s nothing to see. And go write your heart out when the spirit moves you.